How to avoid browser warnings when using the vCenter Web Client with a self-signed certificate


If you have a recent VMware vSphere installation with a vCenter server in production or in a lab then you will be aware of that the Web Client is the recommended choice for managing the environment and that the well known C# based vSphere Client is considered deprecated or legacy (since version 5.1 already).

However, when you connect to the Web Client of your freshly installed vCenter server for the first time using your favorite Internet browser you will be greeted by a more or less alarming warning. Chrome even warns you that VMware might steal your credit card information ;-) (well, they probably already have that) ... You should really be worried whenever you see this warning on a random Internet site, but you don't need to if it's your company internal vCenter server that you try to access.

So, why do you get this message, and how can you get rid of it?

VMware silently adds native USB 3.0 support to ESXi 5.5


The October 2014 patch of ESXi 5.5 already got a lot of attention, because it introduced additional Transparent Page Sharing (TPS) management capabilities to prepare for TPS being disabled by default in upcoming ESXi releases. And William Lam pointed out that this patch enables support for the Apple Mac Pro 6,1 ... but there is even more goodness in this patch!

When adding the associated Image Profiles to the VibMatrix I noticed that this bundle includes a new package named xhci-xhci. The related KB2087362 article only includes the standard disclaimer, but no information about what this really means: xHCI stands for Extensible Host Controller Interface, a USB standard that supports USB 3.0 (or SuperSpeed) controllers and devices.

That means with the latest ESXi 5.5 patch you are - for the first time - able to utilize USB Passthrough with USB 3.0 devices!

[Release] ESXi-Customizer-PS 2.3 - The ESXi image customization script


I have just released version 2.3 of my ESXi-Customizer-PS script - a PowerCLI script to create customized ESXi installation images and the destined successor of my ESXi-Customizer tool.

I was somewhat in a hurry to get this out, because with the release of ESXi 5.5 Update 2 a bug in PowerCLI ImageBuilder manifested itself that needed a workaround. The new version implements this workaround, but also has one other improvement that you will like.

Great flings and a contest!


When you heard about VMware flings for the first time (if ever) you probably wondered what this is: Flings are short-term projects that VMware engineers work on - supposedly in their spare time, just for fun -, and they result in software that is not officially supported by VMware, but serve a specific purpose and address challenges that you might have when using VMware products - in a very handy way. They are published by VMware Labs that also do some very interesting academic research and publications.

VMware releases vSphere 5.5 Update 2 - What's new and how to update free ESXi


It looks like yesterday the whole IT Community was pretty much focused on the much anticipated Apple Live event, so you might have missed an important VMware announcement: vSphere 5.5 Update 2 was released. Besides the usual bug fixes there was one important new functionality added that will make a lot of VMware Admins happy, especially those who do not like the new Web Client.

Before going into some details here are the relevant links to downloads and release notes:

Between VMworlds 2014 ... See you in Barcelona?


Unless you have been living under a rock during the last two weeks you will know that VMworld 2014 US took place in San Francisco. I have not been there, but enjoyed the summer vacation with my family in a rural area of Germany with very poor mobile network coverage. Anyway the constant never-ending stream of VMworld news and buzz could not completely elude my attention ...

Again, this was a great conference with exciting announcements - No worries, I will not repeat here what the crowd of well-known virtualization bloggers has already shouted out. But I am somewhat concerned that there is no more good news left for the yet upcoming VMworld 2014 Europe conference in Barcelona (Oct 14th to 16th) that I will be happy to attend again.

Do you need disk encryption for hosted VMs?

Nowadays disk encryption is a common practice with mobile personal devices, because it prevents unauthorized access to sensitive data when such a device is lost or stolen. I was also aware of the virtual machine encryption capabilities that are built into the VMware Personal Desktop products (Workstation and Fusion) although I never used them ..., but - until recently - I never thought about encrypting a VM that runs on a hosted hypervisor in a data center.

Then this happened: